If You Know The History: 1st May 1943 Charity Cup Celtic 3 Queen’s Park 0

1st May 1943 Charity Cup Celtic 3 Queen’s Park 0

As soon as war was declared, on 3rd September 1939, an edict was issued stating that professional football, along with all other forms of mass entertainment, was to be abandoned. Players’ contracts would be suspended but registrations would remain valid. In simple terms, no money for the players – but they were still tied to their clubs.

As the days passed, and the authorities realised that there would be no mass bombing campaign in cities, a relaxation in the original ban was permitted. Football matches could take place but only on Saturdays and public holidays; they must be confined to regional and district groupings; and crowds could not exceed 8,000, or, for large stadia, 15,000. The Scottish League and Scottish Cup competitions were abandoned for the duration of the war but the Glasgow and Charity Cups were allowed to continue.

And it was in those two local competitions that Celtic had their only two successes of the war years. They won the Glasgow Cup in 1940, beating Rangers 1-0 in the final; and on this day in 1943, they got their Charity Cup campaign for that season off to an excellent start, when they beat Queen’s Park 3-0 at Parkhead. The team selection reflected the uncertainty of war-time, when the fans were never quite sure who would run out in the hoops. That afternoon, Celtic were represented by an eleven of Willie Miller, Bobby Hogg, Harry Dornan, Jimmy Mallan, Joe Mclaughlin, George Paterson, Jimmy Delaney, John McPhail, Joe Rae, Charlie McGinlay and Hugh Long.

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Above: Jimmy Delaney

A crowd of 7,000 was at Celtic Park that day and the goals came from Jimmy Delaney, Hugh Long and an O.G. The win put Celtic through to the semi-final, where they met Clyde.

Jim Craig

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